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Senior Housing Questions for Families

Placing a loved one into senior housing remains a difficult decision for many families, but by asking a few simple questions, families can select the right facility. This helps them achieve peace of mind and attain assistance for the loved one so the latter years of life are a little easier.

When should a famiy consider senior housing?

There is no set age for senior care, so it is a decision that families must make on their own. If an elderly family members health stays stable and he or she enjoys living at home, then perhaps the time has not come. Although, when frequent illness and the possibility of serious injury looms, then senior housing may seem like the best idea. The family is also a factor in the decision, since a family who is able to provide constant assistance easily can replaces a nursing staff.

How do you decide if the senior housing location is right?

Many factors help families decide which facility fits best, but nothing replaces a few visits. Simply walking through an institution usually offers a fair assessment. If the halls smell and visits see no obvious attempts to entertain the seniors, then move to another facility. Mental stimulation, even in small doses, is essential to staving off the symptoms of Alzheimer's. Families should also watch how the staff treats their residents. If they appear gruff and unfriendly to current residents, then they are likely to treat a loved one the same way.

Do families receive assistance for senior housing?

In some states, Medicare pays for a portion or all senior housing and any assets of the client, whether a pension or a home loan can supplement this, which lowers the burden on families. Depending on the level of independence, Medicare may offer to pay for room and board, but not medical services or vice versa. Speak with a lawyer about the Medicare in an individual state.

No loving family finds discussing a senior housing easy, but asking a few simple questions and making inquires can make it less difficult for both the family and the loved one.